New recipes

4 Essential Pintxos — Basque Tapas — Bars in San Sebastián

4 Essential Pintxos — Basque Tapas — Bars in San Sebastián


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

It feels like the secret is out on San Sebastián. It was once a quaint town in the north of Spain, but now the crowds are hip to the incredible beach, artistic Parte Vieja, or old town, and incredible food at affordable prices. What else does one really need?

The fun with San Sebastián is wandering through old town in the evenings, hopping from pintxo bar to pintxo bar — pintxo are Basque tapas, usually skewered on toothpicks, often with a small piece of bread as a base — having a bite, and moving on. There are a lot of options to choose from, but don’t fret if the array seems overwhelming. We’ve eaten our way through the streets and have highlighted the essential stops here. These are the must-eat pintxos in San Sebastián, complete with wine pairings.

Bar Goiz-Argi

Bar Goiz-Argi looks like a very ordinary spot from the outside. It’s easy to pass by, but you’d be making a mistake. The interior is barren and the display of pintxos is basic, but look past all of that and zero in on the prawns, their specialty. Ask for the brocheta de gambas off the menu — a skewer of prawns freshly grilled and topped with red pepper salsa. Served on a slice of baguette, the prawns are so fresh they still have a snap to them.

Also recommended off the menu: the Mari Juli, which is named after the bar’s owner. It’s smoked salmon, Italian pepper, and smoked anchovy, and offers layers of smoke and salt that will make lovers of savory flavors salivate for more. And try a basket of piparras, which are guindilla peppers, fried. Some are hot and some are mild, which makes for a dangerously delicious game of Russian roulette.

To drink: Tío Pepe Dry Sherry. Sherry is underrated. This one has some notes of citrus and is creamy, making it food-friendly – especially with the salty, juicy, spicy flavors in the pintxos mentioned here.

Bar Zeruko

Bar Zeruko is the talk of the town when it comes to pintxos. It’s a lively place, usually packed. What attracts the hungry crowds is the endless array of sexy pintxos along the bar. A lot of places have dull, simple snacks on display, but Bar Zeruko’s are particularly appetizing in appearance.

You can get started with a bite from the bar, but what you’ll want to do is find a table so that you can order off the menu. Start with "La Hoguera de Bacalao" (the salt cod bonfire), which is really unique. A piece of salt cod is served on a mini-grill with a piece of smoldering charcoal underneath. The result is smoky, salty ecstasy. Another one-of-a-kind option is the hamburguesa detxipi, which is a "hamburger" made with cuttlefish — a fleshier relative of squid — with a black ink sponge cake as the bun.

To drink: Txacoli. You can’t do pintxos without trying txakoli at least once. A lot of people mistake it for cider, but it is in fact a wine that’s produced in the Basque Country, as well as neighboring Cantabria and parts of Burgos. It is effervescent, not quite sparkling, and has high levels of acid and low levels of alcohol. It is almost always white (though rosé and red varieties do exist). It’s not meant to be aged, so it’s very young and fresh. With the big flavors of the cod bonfire and the cuttlefish burger, txakoli works perfectly.

Bar La Cepa

For over seven decades, Bar La Cepa has specialized in ibérico ham. That point is highlighted when you enter and see the infinite ham legs hanging above the bar. You can’t go wrong with any menu item that includes the ham, but there are other fantastic pintxos that are less obvious. This is a great place to order queso manchego con membrillo (manchego cheese with quince paste) if you haven’t had it before. It’s a local classic.

Another recommendation is the ensalada de tomate con tonito (tomato, pickled pipparas, local anchovies, and local tuna). It’s San Sebastián on a plate: nothing fancy but the individual ingredients shine – especially the tomatoes and the tuna. If your vision of tomatoes is the watered-down version we so often find in North America, this will open your eyes to what they’re supposed to taste like.

To drink: Beronia Crianza Rioja. You'll get a lot of saltiness from the ham, the manchego cheese, and the anchovies, so a wine with a "sweet" palate is perfect to give your tongue a break. I opted for the Beronia Crianza, which has notes of cherry and other red fruit. It’s a well-balanced wine and is ideal in between those bites of ibérico.

Gandarias Jatetxea

Gandarias – like Bar Zeruko – is one of the more popular pintxo places in San Sebastián. It offers a large array of pintxos at friendly prices, ranging from four to seven euros (about $4.75 to $8.25) a serving. While there are no wrong turns to make here, this is a place that specializes in meat. Solomillo (beef tenderloin), served with a sprinkling of salt, is simple and succulent.

I also opted for my sweet ending of the night at Gandaria, with the torrijas, very similar to French toast — day-old bread revived with eggs, milk, and cinnamon. This is a classic Basque dessert, but, truth be told, a lot of places do a poor job of it. They know what they’re doing at Gandarias, though, as the torrijas come out with a nice sear, adding texture to the soft inside.

To drink: González Byass Nectar Pedro Ximénez Sherry. For the red meat, I'd return to the Beronia Crianza, but for the dessert, I'd opt to go sweet-sweet. The Nectar is a different type of sweet than the dessert, rich with raisin and fig notes. It lingers in your mouth like melted chocolate. I’d be happy to have this drizzled over ice cream, but it worked very well with the moist, fatty torrijas.


The 9 Best Pintxos Bars in San Sebastian and What to Eat There

San Sebastian has evolved into quite a food Mecca over the last 30 years. Together with the surrounding area, Spanish Basque country has the highest number of Michelin star restaurants in the world. But molecular gastronomy aside, it's really the down home pintxos bars -- the Basque equivalent of tapas -- that form the cornerstone of San Sebastian's foodie culture.

The old quarter of the city is packed with pintxos restaurants -- so many that knowing where to go and what to order can be very overwhelming. I was lucky to have some expert assistance when I began my trip. San Sebastian Food, a luxury gastronomy company in the area, showed me the ropes, took the reins on ordering, and indulged me in all my food nerdiness. It was great to have someone there give me all the cultural background on what I was eating, how the ingredients were produced, and why the dishes came to be -- like, for instance, that the Gilda, a skewer with anchovies, olives and hot peppers, was named after Rita Hayworth because she is similarly tall and spicy.

Pintxos eating is rooted in many traditions. First, you're meant to throw your napkins on the ground. This also means that the dirtier the pintxos bar, the better it is. In the case of La Mejillonera, where the specialty is mussels of all kinds, the empty shells are even discarded on the floor (think peanut shells in a New England ale house). The second most important thing about Basque culture is that everyone respects the honor system. You order drinks and bites as you go. When you're ready to leave, you tell the bartender what you had and pay. It was very jarring for this New Yorker not to pull out a credit card after each glass of Rioja. But it's a superior experience for the diner, so long as no one takes advantage.

I could go on and on about San Sebastian, but I want to let you discover it for yourself. Below is a list of all my favorite pintxos spots and what to eat there. Most places I discovered through San Sebastian Food, and a few I went to throughout the week per their recommendations. Each spot has a different specialty, which was usually written on a chalkboard behind the bar. The cold dishes are laid out on the counter, but you really need to know what each place is known for if you want to order right and not feel like a big dumb American weenie right off the plane.

1. Goiz Argi
Calle de Fermín Calbetón 4

This is the place to go for seafood a la plancha. We had wonderful prawn skewers (brocheta de gambas), grilled squid (chipiron a la plancha), and pimientos di padron. They all pair great with Txakoli, the young white wine of the region that was described to me as a "breakfast wine." Get the recipe for Squid and Shrimp Skewers here.

2. Txepetxa
Calle Pescaderia 5

If the fish-shaped menu on the wall is any indication, this place is all anchovies, all the time. Try the Gilda, the first pintxos invented in San Sebastian and named for Rita Hayworth because again, she is tall and spicy. This is also where I had the anchovy toast with blueberry jam. Have some sidra with the meal.

3. Zeruko
Calle Pescaderia 10 (right across from Txepetxa)

This is one of the modernist pintxos bars that incorporates some of the molecular gastronomy that the region is known for. The bar is full of interesting and beautiful creations. Go to town!

4. Borda Berri
Fermin Calbeton 12

We ate a ton here, and it's one of the places that I returned to. Idiazabal and Hongos (sheep milk cheese and wild mushroom) Risotto was amazing. But glutards be warned: "risotto" in San Sebastian is made with orzo, not rice. The Veal Cheeks (pictured) here are melt in your mouth amazing, as is the pulpo (octopus). Though less traditional in the north, they also served up a great Salmorejo -- a creamy-style gazpacho that was my go-to when traveling in Andalucia.

5. Gandarias
Calle 31 de Agosto

Don't miss the solomio (pictured). And do a little surf and turf by pairing it with the shrimp and chorizo brocheta. We drank an amazing red wine here: Ribera del Duero (Krel).

6. Gambara
Calle San Jeronimo 21

This is the place for seasonal specialties like the mushroom plate. It's expensive, but worth it. You'll never taste anything so pure and umami-laden. Wash it all down with a glass of Navarra rose.

7. La Viña
Calle Agosto, 31

I would have never guessed I'd be eating cheesecake in San Sebastian. But you'd be a fool to not grab a slice at La Vina. It's very light and airy -- a cross between a custard and a cheesecake. The tortilla ain't half bad either if you want to return for lunch. Get the recipe for Spanish-Style Cheesecake here.

8. La Mejillonera
Calle del Puerto 15

This place is packed with locals. Don't be shy and elbow your way to the counter. I had every type of mussels and they were all delicious. Try the mejillones picantes, Patatas Bravas, and Calamares.

9. La Cuchara de San Telmo
Calle 31 de Agosto, 28

This place was on the New York Times list and also makes a mean veal cheek. The bacalao and bonito were also delicious. Like Borda Berri you can't really go wrong with whatever is on the chalkboard. So get adventurous.

For more on where to eat, drink, and sleep in San Sebastian, check out my full guide here.


The 9 Best Pintxos Bars in San Sebastian and What to Eat There

San Sebastian has evolved into quite a food Mecca over the last 30 years. Together with the surrounding area, Spanish Basque country has the highest number of Michelin star restaurants in the world. But molecular gastronomy aside, it's really the down home pintxos bars -- the Basque equivalent of tapas -- that form the cornerstone of San Sebastian's foodie culture.

The old quarter of the city is packed with pintxos restaurants -- so many that knowing where to go and what to order can be very overwhelming. I was lucky to have some expert assistance when I began my trip. San Sebastian Food, a luxury gastronomy company in the area, showed me the ropes, took the reins on ordering, and indulged me in all my food nerdiness. It was great to have someone there give me all the cultural background on what I was eating, how the ingredients were produced, and why the dishes came to be -- like, for instance, that the Gilda, a skewer with anchovies, olives and hot peppers, was named after Rita Hayworth because she is similarly tall and spicy.

Pintxos eating is rooted in many traditions. First, you're meant to throw your napkins on the ground. This also means that the dirtier the pintxos bar, the better it is. In the case of La Mejillonera, where the specialty is mussels of all kinds, the empty shells are even discarded on the floor (think peanut shells in a New England ale house). The second most important thing about Basque culture is that everyone respects the honor system. You order drinks and bites as you go. When you're ready to leave, you tell the bartender what you had and pay. It was very jarring for this New Yorker not to pull out a credit card after each glass of Rioja. But it's a superior experience for the diner, so long as no one takes advantage.

I could go on and on about San Sebastian, but I want to let you discover it for yourself. Below is a list of all my favorite pintxos spots and what to eat there. Most places I discovered through San Sebastian Food, and a few I went to throughout the week per their recommendations. Each spot has a different specialty, which was usually written on a chalkboard behind the bar. The cold dishes are laid out on the counter, but you really need to know what each place is known for if you want to order right and not feel like a big dumb American weenie right off the plane.

1. Goiz Argi
Calle de Fermín Calbetón 4

This is the place to go for seafood a la plancha. We had wonderful prawn skewers (brocheta de gambas), grilled squid (chipiron a la plancha), and pimientos di padron. They all pair great with Txakoli, the young white wine of the region that was described to me as a "breakfast wine." Get the recipe for Squid and Shrimp Skewers here.

2. Txepetxa
Calle Pescaderia 5

If the fish-shaped menu on the wall is any indication, this place is all anchovies, all the time. Try the Gilda, the first pintxos invented in San Sebastian and named for Rita Hayworth because again, she is tall and spicy. This is also where I had the anchovy toast with blueberry jam. Have some sidra with the meal.

3. Zeruko
Calle Pescaderia 10 (right across from Txepetxa)

This is one of the modernist pintxos bars that incorporates some of the molecular gastronomy that the region is known for. The bar is full of interesting and beautiful creations. Go to town!

4. Borda Berri
Fermin Calbeton 12

We ate a ton here, and it's one of the places that I returned to. Idiazabal and Hongos (sheep milk cheese and wild mushroom) Risotto was amazing. But glutards be warned: "risotto" in San Sebastian is made with orzo, not rice. The Veal Cheeks (pictured) here are melt in your mouth amazing, as is the pulpo (octopus). Though less traditional in the north, they also served up a great Salmorejo -- a creamy-style gazpacho that was my go-to when traveling in Andalucia.

5. Gandarias
Calle 31 de Agosto

Don't miss the solomio (pictured). And do a little surf and turf by pairing it with the shrimp and chorizo brocheta. We drank an amazing red wine here: Ribera del Duero (Krel).

6. Gambara
Calle San Jeronimo 21

This is the place for seasonal specialties like the mushroom plate. It's expensive, but worth it. You'll never taste anything so pure and umami-laden. Wash it all down with a glass of Navarra rose.

7. La Viña
Calle Agosto, 31

I would have never guessed I'd be eating cheesecake in San Sebastian. But you'd be a fool to not grab a slice at La Vina. It's very light and airy -- a cross between a custard and a cheesecake. The tortilla ain't half bad either if you want to return for lunch. Get the recipe for Spanish-Style Cheesecake here.

8. La Mejillonera
Calle del Puerto 15

This place is packed with locals. Don't be shy and elbow your way to the counter. I had every type of mussels and they were all delicious. Try the mejillones picantes, Patatas Bravas, and Calamares.

9. La Cuchara de San Telmo
Calle 31 de Agosto, 28

This place was on the New York Times list and also makes a mean veal cheek. The bacalao and bonito were also delicious. Like Borda Berri you can't really go wrong with whatever is on the chalkboard. So get adventurous.

For more on where to eat, drink, and sleep in San Sebastian, check out my full guide here.


The 9 Best Pintxos Bars in San Sebastian and What to Eat There

San Sebastian has evolved into quite a food Mecca over the last 30 years. Together with the surrounding area, Spanish Basque country has the highest number of Michelin star restaurants in the world. But molecular gastronomy aside, it's really the down home pintxos bars -- the Basque equivalent of tapas -- that form the cornerstone of San Sebastian's foodie culture.

The old quarter of the city is packed with pintxos restaurants -- so many that knowing where to go and what to order can be very overwhelming. I was lucky to have some expert assistance when I began my trip. San Sebastian Food, a luxury gastronomy company in the area, showed me the ropes, took the reins on ordering, and indulged me in all my food nerdiness. It was great to have someone there give me all the cultural background on what I was eating, how the ingredients were produced, and why the dishes came to be -- like, for instance, that the Gilda, a skewer with anchovies, olives and hot peppers, was named after Rita Hayworth because she is similarly tall and spicy.

Pintxos eating is rooted in many traditions. First, you're meant to throw your napkins on the ground. This also means that the dirtier the pintxos bar, the better it is. In the case of La Mejillonera, where the specialty is mussels of all kinds, the empty shells are even discarded on the floor (think peanut shells in a New England ale house). The second most important thing about Basque culture is that everyone respects the honor system. You order drinks and bites as you go. When you're ready to leave, you tell the bartender what you had and pay. It was very jarring for this New Yorker not to pull out a credit card after each glass of Rioja. But it's a superior experience for the diner, so long as no one takes advantage.

I could go on and on about San Sebastian, but I want to let you discover it for yourself. Below is a list of all my favorite pintxos spots and what to eat there. Most places I discovered through San Sebastian Food, and a few I went to throughout the week per their recommendations. Each spot has a different specialty, which was usually written on a chalkboard behind the bar. The cold dishes are laid out on the counter, but you really need to know what each place is known for if you want to order right and not feel like a big dumb American weenie right off the plane.

1. Goiz Argi
Calle de Fermín Calbetón 4

This is the place to go for seafood a la plancha. We had wonderful prawn skewers (brocheta de gambas), grilled squid (chipiron a la plancha), and pimientos di padron. They all pair great with Txakoli, the young white wine of the region that was described to me as a "breakfast wine." Get the recipe for Squid and Shrimp Skewers here.

2. Txepetxa
Calle Pescaderia 5

If the fish-shaped menu on the wall is any indication, this place is all anchovies, all the time. Try the Gilda, the first pintxos invented in San Sebastian and named for Rita Hayworth because again, she is tall and spicy. This is also where I had the anchovy toast with blueberry jam. Have some sidra with the meal.

3. Zeruko
Calle Pescaderia 10 (right across from Txepetxa)

This is one of the modernist pintxos bars that incorporates some of the molecular gastronomy that the region is known for. The bar is full of interesting and beautiful creations. Go to town!

4. Borda Berri
Fermin Calbeton 12

We ate a ton here, and it's one of the places that I returned to. Idiazabal and Hongos (sheep milk cheese and wild mushroom) Risotto was amazing. But glutards be warned: "risotto" in San Sebastian is made with orzo, not rice. The Veal Cheeks (pictured) here are melt in your mouth amazing, as is the pulpo (octopus). Though less traditional in the north, they also served up a great Salmorejo -- a creamy-style gazpacho that was my go-to when traveling in Andalucia.

5. Gandarias
Calle 31 de Agosto

Don't miss the solomio (pictured). And do a little surf and turf by pairing it with the shrimp and chorizo brocheta. We drank an amazing red wine here: Ribera del Duero (Krel).

6. Gambara
Calle San Jeronimo 21

This is the place for seasonal specialties like the mushroom plate. It's expensive, but worth it. You'll never taste anything so pure and umami-laden. Wash it all down with a glass of Navarra rose.

7. La Viña
Calle Agosto, 31

I would have never guessed I'd be eating cheesecake in San Sebastian. But you'd be a fool to not grab a slice at La Vina. It's very light and airy -- a cross between a custard and a cheesecake. The tortilla ain't half bad either if you want to return for lunch. Get the recipe for Spanish-Style Cheesecake here.

8. La Mejillonera
Calle del Puerto 15

This place is packed with locals. Don't be shy and elbow your way to the counter. I had every type of mussels and they were all delicious. Try the mejillones picantes, Patatas Bravas, and Calamares.

9. La Cuchara de San Telmo
Calle 31 de Agosto, 28

This place was on the New York Times list and also makes a mean veal cheek. The bacalao and bonito were also delicious. Like Borda Berri you can't really go wrong with whatever is on the chalkboard. So get adventurous.

For more on where to eat, drink, and sleep in San Sebastian, check out my full guide here.


The 9 Best Pintxos Bars in San Sebastian and What to Eat There

San Sebastian has evolved into quite a food Mecca over the last 30 years. Together with the surrounding area, Spanish Basque country has the highest number of Michelin star restaurants in the world. But molecular gastronomy aside, it's really the down home pintxos bars -- the Basque equivalent of tapas -- that form the cornerstone of San Sebastian's foodie culture.

The old quarter of the city is packed with pintxos restaurants -- so many that knowing where to go and what to order can be very overwhelming. I was lucky to have some expert assistance when I began my trip. San Sebastian Food, a luxury gastronomy company in the area, showed me the ropes, took the reins on ordering, and indulged me in all my food nerdiness. It was great to have someone there give me all the cultural background on what I was eating, how the ingredients were produced, and why the dishes came to be -- like, for instance, that the Gilda, a skewer with anchovies, olives and hot peppers, was named after Rita Hayworth because she is similarly tall and spicy.

Pintxos eating is rooted in many traditions. First, you're meant to throw your napkins on the ground. This also means that the dirtier the pintxos bar, the better it is. In the case of La Mejillonera, where the specialty is mussels of all kinds, the empty shells are even discarded on the floor (think peanut shells in a New England ale house). The second most important thing about Basque culture is that everyone respects the honor system. You order drinks and bites as you go. When you're ready to leave, you tell the bartender what you had and pay. It was very jarring for this New Yorker not to pull out a credit card after each glass of Rioja. But it's a superior experience for the diner, so long as no one takes advantage.

I could go on and on about San Sebastian, but I want to let you discover it for yourself. Below is a list of all my favorite pintxos spots and what to eat there. Most places I discovered through San Sebastian Food, and a few I went to throughout the week per their recommendations. Each spot has a different specialty, which was usually written on a chalkboard behind the bar. The cold dishes are laid out on the counter, but you really need to know what each place is known for if you want to order right and not feel like a big dumb American weenie right off the plane.

1. Goiz Argi
Calle de Fermín Calbetón 4

This is the place to go for seafood a la plancha. We had wonderful prawn skewers (brocheta de gambas), grilled squid (chipiron a la plancha), and pimientos di padron. They all pair great with Txakoli, the young white wine of the region that was described to me as a "breakfast wine." Get the recipe for Squid and Shrimp Skewers here.

2. Txepetxa
Calle Pescaderia 5

If the fish-shaped menu on the wall is any indication, this place is all anchovies, all the time. Try the Gilda, the first pintxos invented in San Sebastian and named for Rita Hayworth because again, she is tall and spicy. This is also where I had the anchovy toast with blueberry jam. Have some sidra with the meal.

3. Zeruko
Calle Pescaderia 10 (right across from Txepetxa)

This is one of the modernist pintxos bars that incorporates some of the molecular gastronomy that the region is known for. The bar is full of interesting and beautiful creations. Go to town!

4. Borda Berri
Fermin Calbeton 12

We ate a ton here, and it's one of the places that I returned to. Idiazabal and Hongos (sheep milk cheese and wild mushroom) Risotto was amazing. But glutards be warned: "risotto" in San Sebastian is made with orzo, not rice. The Veal Cheeks (pictured) here are melt in your mouth amazing, as is the pulpo (octopus). Though less traditional in the north, they also served up a great Salmorejo -- a creamy-style gazpacho that was my go-to when traveling in Andalucia.

5. Gandarias
Calle 31 de Agosto

Don't miss the solomio (pictured). And do a little surf and turf by pairing it with the shrimp and chorizo brocheta. We drank an amazing red wine here: Ribera del Duero (Krel).

6. Gambara
Calle San Jeronimo 21

This is the place for seasonal specialties like the mushroom plate. It's expensive, but worth it. You'll never taste anything so pure and umami-laden. Wash it all down with a glass of Navarra rose.

7. La Viña
Calle Agosto, 31

I would have never guessed I'd be eating cheesecake in San Sebastian. But you'd be a fool to not grab a slice at La Vina. It's very light and airy -- a cross between a custard and a cheesecake. The tortilla ain't half bad either if you want to return for lunch. Get the recipe for Spanish-Style Cheesecake here.

8. La Mejillonera
Calle del Puerto 15

This place is packed with locals. Don't be shy and elbow your way to the counter. I had every type of mussels and they were all delicious. Try the mejillones picantes, Patatas Bravas, and Calamares.

9. La Cuchara de San Telmo
Calle 31 de Agosto, 28

This place was on the New York Times list and also makes a mean veal cheek. The bacalao and bonito were also delicious. Like Borda Berri you can't really go wrong with whatever is on the chalkboard. So get adventurous.

For more on where to eat, drink, and sleep in San Sebastian, check out my full guide here.


The 9 Best Pintxos Bars in San Sebastian and What to Eat There

San Sebastian has evolved into quite a food Mecca over the last 30 years. Together with the surrounding area, Spanish Basque country has the highest number of Michelin star restaurants in the world. But molecular gastronomy aside, it's really the down home pintxos bars -- the Basque equivalent of tapas -- that form the cornerstone of San Sebastian's foodie culture.

The old quarter of the city is packed with pintxos restaurants -- so many that knowing where to go and what to order can be very overwhelming. I was lucky to have some expert assistance when I began my trip. San Sebastian Food, a luxury gastronomy company in the area, showed me the ropes, took the reins on ordering, and indulged me in all my food nerdiness. It was great to have someone there give me all the cultural background on what I was eating, how the ingredients were produced, and why the dishes came to be -- like, for instance, that the Gilda, a skewer with anchovies, olives and hot peppers, was named after Rita Hayworth because she is similarly tall and spicy.

Pintxos eating is rooted in many traditions. First, you're meant to throw your napkins on the ground. This also means that the dirtier the pintxos bar, the better it is. In the case of La Mejillonera, where the specialty is mussels of all kinds, the empty shells are even discarded on the floor (think peanut shells in a New England ale house). The second most important thing about Basque culture is that everyone respects the honor system. You order drinks and bites as you go. When you're ready to leave, you tell the bartender what you had and pay. It was very jarring for this New Yorker not to pull out a credit card after each glass of Rioja. But it's a superior experience for the diner, so long as no one takes advantage.

I could go on and on about San Sebastian, but I want to let you discover it for yourself. Below is a list of all my favorite pintxos spots and what to eat there. Most places I discovered through San Sebastian Food, and a few I went to throughout the week per their recommendations. Each spot has a different specialty, which was usually written on a chalkboard behind the bar. The cold dishes are laid out on the counter, but you really need to know what each place is known for if you want to order right and not feel like a big dumb American weenie right off the plane.

1. Goiz Argi
Calle de Fermín Calbetón 4

This is the place to go for seafood a la plancha. We had wonderful prawn skewers (brocheta de gambas), grilled squid (chipiron a la plancha), and pimientos di padron. They all pair great with Txakoli, the young white wine of the region that was described to me as a "breakfast wine." Get the recipe for Squid and Shrimp Skewers here.

2. Txepetxa
Calle Pescaderia 5

If the fish-shaped menu on the wall is any indication, this place is all anchovies, all the time. Try the Gilda, the first pintxos invented in San Sebastian and named for Rita Hayworth because again, she is tall and spicy. This is also where I had the anchovy toast with blueberry jam. Have some sidra with the meal.

3. Zeruko
Calle Pescaderia 10 (right across from Txepetxa)

This is one of the modernist pintxos bars that incorporates some of the molecular gastronomy that the region is known for. The bar is full of interesting and beautiful creations. Go to town!

4. Borda Berri
Fermin Calbeton 12

We ate a ton here, and it's one of the places that I returned to. Idiazabal and Hongos (sheep milk cheese and wild mushroom) Risotto was amazing. But glutards be warned: "risotto" in San Sebastian is made with orzo, not rice. The Veal Cheeks (pictured) here are melt in your mouth amazing, as is the pulpo (octopus). Though less traditional in the north, they also served up a great Salmorejo -- a creamy-style gazpacho that was my go-to when traveling in Andalucia.

5. Gandarias
Calle 31 de Agosto

Don't miss the solomio (pictured). And do a little surf and turf by pairing it with the shrimp and chorizo brocheta. We drank an amazing red wine here: Ribera del Duero (Krel).

6. Gambara
Calle San Jeronimo 21

This is the place for seasonal specialties like the mushroom plate. It's expensive, but worth it. You'll never taste anything so pure and umami-laden. Wash it all down with a glass of Navarra rose.

7. La Viña
Calle Agosto, 31

I would have never guessed I'd be eating cheesecake in San Sebastian. But you'd be a fool to not grab a slice at La Vina. It's very light and airy -- a cross between a custard and a cheesecake. The tortilla ain't half bad either if you want to return for lunch. Get the recipe for Spanish-Style Cheesecake here.

8. La Mejillonera
Calle del Puerto 15

This place is packed with locals. Don't be shy and elbow your way to the counter. I had every type of mussels and they were all delicious. Try the mejillones picantes, Patatas Bravas, and Calamares.

9. La Cuchara de San Telmo
Calle 31 de Agosto, 28

This place was on the New York Times list and also makes a mean veal cheek. The bacalao and bonito were also delicious. Like Borda Berri you can't really go wrong with whatever is on the chalkboard. So get adventurous.

For more on where to eat, drink, and sleep in San Sebastian, check out my full guide here.


The 9 Best Pintxos Bars in San Sebastian and What to Eat There

San Sebastian has evolved into quite a food Mecca over the last 30 years. Together with the surrounding area, Spanish Basque country has the highest number of Michelin star restaurants in the world. But molecular gastronomy aside, it's really the down home pintxos bars -- the Basque equivalent of tapas -- that form the cornerstone of San Sebastian's foodie culture.

The old quarter of the city is packed with pintxos restaurants -- so many that knowing where to go and what to order can be very overwhelming. I was lucky to have some expert assistance when I began my trip. San Sebastian Food, a luxury gastronomy company in the area, showed me the ropes, took the reins on ordering, and indulged me in all my food nerdiness. It was great to have someone there give me all the cultural background on what I was eating, how the ingredients were produced, and why the dishes came to be -- like, for instance, that the Gilda, a skewer with anchovies, olives and hot peppers, was named after Rita Hayworth because she is similarly tall and spicy.

Pintxos eating is rooted in many traditions. First, you're meant to throw your napkins on the ground. This also means that the dirtier the pintxos bar, the better it is. In the case of La Mejillonera, where the specialty is mussels of all kinds, the empty shells are even discarded on the floor (think peanut shells in a New England ale house). The second most important thing about Basque culture is that everyone respects the honor system. You order drinks and bites as you go. When you're ready to leave, you tell the bartender what you had and pay. It was very jarring for this New Yorker not to pull out a credit card after each glass of Rioja. But it's a superior experience for the diner, so long as no one takes advantage.

I could go on and on about San Sebastian, but I want to let you discover it for yourself. Below is a list of all my favorite pintxos spots and what to eat there. Most places I discovered through San Sebastian Food, and a few I went to throughout the week per their recommendations. Each spot has a different specialty, which was usually written on a chalkboard behind the bar. The cold dishes are laid out on the counter, but you really need to know what each place is known for if you want to order right and not feel like a big dumb American weenie right off the plane.

1. Goiz Argi
Calle de Fermín Calbetón 4

This is the place to go for seafood a la plancha. We had wonderful prawn skewers (brocheta de gambas), grilled squid (chipiron a la plancha), and pimientos di padron. They all pair great with Txakoli, the young white wine of the region that was described to me as a "breakfast wine." Get the recipe for Squid and Shrimp Skewers here.

2. Txepetxa
Calle Pescaderia 5

If the fish-shaped menu on the wall is any indication, this place is all anchovies, all the time. Try the Gilda, the first pintxos invented in San Sebastian and named for Rita Hayworth because again, she is tall and spicy. This is also where I had the anchovy toast with blueberry jam. Have some sidra with the meal.

3. Zeruko
Calle Pescaderia 10 (right across from Txepetxa)

This is one of the modernist pintxos bars that incorporates some of the molecular gastronomy that the region is known for. The bar is full of interesting and beautiful creations. Go to town!

4. Borda Berri
Fermin Calbeton 12

We ate a ton here, and it's one of the places that I returned to. Idiazabal and Hongos (sheep milk cheese and wild mushroom) Risotto was amazing. But glutards be warned: "risotto" in San Sebastian is made with orzo, not rice. The Veal Cheeks (pictured) here are melt in your mouth amazing, as is the pulpo (octopus). Though less traditional in the north, they also served up a great Salmorejo -- a creamy-style gazpacho that was my go-to when traveling in Andalucia.

5. Gandarias
Calle 31 de Agosto

Don't miss the solomio (pictured). And do a little surf and turf by pairing it with the shrimp and chorizo brocheta. We drank an amazing red wine here: Ribera del Duero (Krel).

6. Gambara
Calle San Jeronimo 21

This is the place for seasonal specialties like the mushroom plate. It's expensive, but worth it. You'll never taste anything so pure and umami-laden. Wash it all down with a glass of Navarra rose.

7. La Viña
Calle Agosto, 31

I would have never guessed I'd be eating cheesecake in San Sebastian. But you'd be a fool to not grab a slice at La Vina. It's very light and airy -- a cross between a custard and a cheesecake. The tortilla ain't half bad either if you want to return for lunch. Get the recipe for Spanish-Style Cheesecake here.

8. La Mejillonera
Calle del Puerto 15

This place is packed with locals. Don't be shy and elbow your way to the counter. I had every type of mussels and they were all delicious. Try the mejillones picantes, Patatas Bravas, and Calamares.

9. La Cuchara de San Telmo
Calle 31 de Agosto, 28

This place was on the New York Times list and also makes a mean veal cheek. The bacalao and bonito were also delicious. Like Borda Berri you can't really go wrong with whatever is on the chalkboard. So get adventurous.

For more on where to eat, drink, and sleep in San Sebastian, check out my full guide here.


The 9 Best Pintxos Bars in San Sebastian and What to Eat There

San Sebastian has evolved into quite a food Mecca over the last 30 years. Together with the surrounding area, Spanish Basque country has the highest number of Michelin star restaurants in the world. But molecular gastronomy aside, it's really the down home pintxos bars -- the Basque equivalent of tapas -- that form the cornerstone of San Sebastian's foodie culture.

The old quarter of the city is packed with pintxos restaurants -- so many that knowing where to go and what to order can be very overwhelming. I was lucky to have some expert assistance when I began my trip. San Sebastian Food, a luxury gastronomy company in the area, showed me the ropes, took the reins on ordering, and indulged me in all my food nerdiness. It was great to have someone there give me all the cultural background on what I was eating, how the ingredients were produced, and why the dishes came to be -- like, for instance, that the Gilda, a skewer with anchovies, olives and hot peppers, was named after Rita Hayworth because she is similarly tall and spicy.

Pintxos eating is rooted in many traditions. First, you're meant to throw your napkins on the ground. This also means that the dirtier the pintxos bar, the better it is. In the case of La Mejillonera, where the specialty is mussels of all kinds, the empty shells are even discarded on the floor (think peanut shells in a New England ale house). The second most important thing about Basque culture is that everyone respects the honor system. You order drinks and bites as you go. When you're ready to leave, you tell the bartender what you had and pay. It was very jarring for this New Yorker not to pull out a credit card after each glass of Rioja. But it's a superior experience for the diner, so long as no one takes advantage.

I could go on and on about San Sebastian, but I want to let you discover it for yourself. Below is a list of all my favorite pintxos spots and what to eat there. Most places I discovered through San Sebastian Food, and a few I went to throughout the week per their recommendations. Each spot has a different specialty, which was usually written on a chalkboard behind the bar. The cold dishes are laid out on the counter, but you really need to know what each place is known for if you want to order right and not feel like a big dumb American weenie right off the plane.

1. Goiz Argi
Calle de Fermín Calbetón 4

This is the place to go for seafood a la plancha. We had wonderful prawn skewers (brocheta de gambas), grilled squid (chipiron a la plancha), and pimientos di padron. They all pair great with Txakoli, the young white wine of the region that was described to me as a "breakfast wine." Get the recipe for Squid and Shrimp Skewers here.

2. Txepetxa
Calle Pescaderia 5

If the fish-shaped menu on the wall is any indication, this place is all anchovies, all the time. Try the Gilda, the first pintxos invented in San Sebastian and named for Rita Hayworth because again, she is tall and spicy. This is also where I had the anchovy toast with blueberry jam. Have some sidra with the meal.

3. Zeruko
Calle Pescaderia 10 (right across from Txepetxa)

This is one of the modernist pintxos bars that incorporates some of the molecular gastronomy that the region is known for. The bar is full of interesting and beautiful creations. Go to town!

4. Borda Berri
Fermin Calbeton 12

We ate a ton here, and it's one of the places that I returned to. Idiazabal and Hongos (sheep milk cheese and wild mushroom) Risotto was amazing. But glutards be warned: "risotto" in San Sebastian is made with orzo, not rice. The Veal Cheeks (pictured) here are melt in your mouth amazing, as is the pulpo (octopus). Though less traditional in the north, they also served up a great Salmorejo -- a creamy-style gazpacho that was my go-to when traveling in Andalucia.

5. Gandarias
Calle 31 de Agosto

Don't miss the solomio (pictured). And do a little surf and turf by pairing it with the shrimp and chorizo brocheta. We drank an amazing red wine here: Ribera del Duero (Krel).

6. Gambara
Calle San Jeronimo 21

This is the place for seasonal specialties like the mushroom plate. It's expensive, but worth it. You'll never taste anything so pure and umami-laden. Wash it all down with a glass of Navarra rose.

7. La Viña
Calle Agosto, 31

I would have never guessed I'd be eating cheesecake in San Sebastian. But you'd be a fool to not grab a slice at La Vina. It's very light and airy -- a cross between a custard and a cheesecake. The tortilla ain't half bad either if you want to return for lunch. Get the recipe for Spanish-Style Cheesecake here.

8. La Mejillonera
Calle del Puerto 15

This place is packed with locals. Don't be shy and elbow your way to the counter. I had every type of mussels and they were all delicious. Try the mejillones picantes, Patatas Bravas, and Calamares.

9. La Cuchara de San Telmo
Calle 31 de Agosto, 28

This place was on the New York Times list and also makes a mean veal cheek. The bacalao and bonito were also delicious. Like Borda Berri you can't really go wrong with whatever is on the chalkboard. So get adventurous.

For more on where to eat, drink, and sleep in San Sebastian, check out my full guide here.


The 9 Best Pintxos Bars in San Sebastian and What to Eat There

San Sebastian has evolved into quite a food Mecca over the last 30 years. Together with the surrounding area, Spanish Basque country has the highest number of Michelin star restaurants in the world. But molecular gastronomy aside, it's really the down home pintxos bars -- the Basque equivalent of tapas -- that form the cornerstone of San Sebastian's foodie culture.

The old quarter of the city is packed with pintxos restaurants -- so many that knowing where to go and what to order can be very overwhelming. I was lucky to have some expert assistance when I began my trip. San Sebastian Food, a luxury gastronomy company in the area, showed me the ropes, took the reins on ordering, and indulged me in all my food nerdiness. It was great to have someone there give me all the cultural background on what I was eating, how the ingredients were produced, and why the dishes came to be -- like, for instance, that the Gilda, a skewer with anchovies, olives and hot peppers, was named after Rita Hayworth because she is similarly tall and spicy.

Pintxos eating is rooted in many traditions. First, you're meant to throw your napkins on the ground. This also means that the dirtier the pintxos bar, the better it is. In the case of La Mejillonera, where the specialty is mussels of all kinds, the empty shells are even discarded on the floor (think peanut shells in a New England ale house). The second most important thing about Basque culture is that everyone respects the honor system. You order drinks and bites as you go. When you're ready to leave, you tell the bartender what you had and pay. It was very jarring for this New Yorker not to pull out a credit card after each glass of Rioja. But it's a superior experience for the diner, so long as no one takes advantage.

I could go on and on about San Sebastian, but I want to let you discover it for yourself. Below is a list of all my favorite pintxos spots and what to eat there. Most places I discovered through San Sebastian Food, and a few I went to throughout the week per their recommendations. Each spot has a different specialty, which was usually written on a chalkboard behind the bar. The cold dishes are laid out on the counter, but you really need to know what each place is known for if you want to order right and not feel like a big dumb American weenie right off the plane.

1. Goiz Argi
Calle de Fermín Calbetón 4

This is the place to go for seafood a la plancha. We had wonderful prawn skewers (brocheta de gambas), grilled squid (chipiron a la plancha), and pimientos di padron. They all pair great with Txakoli, the young white wine of the region that was described to me as a "breakfast wine." Get the recipe for Squid and Shrimp Skewers here.

2. Txepetxa
Calle Pescaderia 5

If the fish-shaped menu on the wall is any indication, this place is all anchovies, all the time. Try the Gilda, the first pintxos invented in San Sebastian and named for Rita Hayworth because again, she is tall and spicy. This is also where I had the anchovy toast with blueberry jam. Have some sidra with the meal.

3. Zeruko
Calle Pescaderia 10 (right across from Txepetxa)

This is one of the modernist pintxos bars that incorporates some of the molecular gastronomy that the region is known for. The bar is full of interesting and beautiful creations. Go to town!

4. Borda Berri
Fermin Calbeton 12

We ate a ton here, and it's one of the places that I returned to. Idiazabal and Hongos (sheep milk cheese and wild mushroom) Risotto was amazing. But glutards be warned: "risotto" in San Sebastian is made with orzo, not rice. The Veal Cheeks (pictured) here are melt in your mouth amazing, as is the pulpo (octopus). Though less traditional in the north, they also served up a great Salmorejo -- a creamy-style gazpacho that was my go-to when traveling in Andalucia.

5. Gandarias
Calle 31 de Agosto

Don't miss the solomio (pictured). And do a little surf and turf by pairing it with the shrimp and chorizo brocheta. We drank an amazing red wine here: Ribera del Duero (Krel).

6. Gambara
Calle San Jeronimo 21

This is the place for seasonal specialties like the mushroom plate. It's expensive, but worth it. You'll never taste anything so pure and umami-laden. Wash it all down with a glass of Navarra rose.

7. La Viña
Calle Agosto, 31

I would have never guessed I'd be eating cheesecake in San Sebastian. But you'd be a fool to not grab a slice at La Vina. It's very light and airy -- a cross between a custard and a cheesecake. The tortilla ain't half bad either if you want to return for lunch. Get the recipe for Spanish-Style Cheesecake here.

8. La Mejillonera
Calle del Puerto 15

This place is packed with locals. Don't be shy and elbow your way to the counter. I had every type of mussels and they were all delicious. Try the mejillones picantes, Patatas Bravas, and Calamares.

9. La Cuchara de San Telmo
Calle 31 de Agosto, 28

This place was on the New York Times list and also makes a mean veal cheek. The bacalao and bonito were also delicious. Like Borda Berri you can't really go wrong with whatever is on the chalkboard. So get adventurous.

For more on where to eat, drink, and sleep in San Sebastian, check out my full guide here.


The 9 Best Pintxos Bars in San Sebastian and What to Eat There

San Sebastian has evolved into quite a food Mecca over the last 30 years. Together with the surrounding area, Spanish Basque country has the highest number of Michelin star restaurants in the world. But molecular gastronomy aside, it's really the down home pintxos bars -- the Basque equivalent of tapas -- that form the cornerstone of San Sebastian's foodie culture.

The old quarter of the city is packed with pintxos restaurants -- so many that knowing where to go and what to order can be very overwhelming. I was lucky to have some expert assistance when I began my trip. San Sebastian Food, a luxury gastronomy company in the area, showed me the ropes, took the reins on ordering, and indulged me in all my food nerdiness. It was great to have someone there give me all the cultural background on what I was eating, how the ingredients were produced, and why the dishes came to be -- like, for instance, that the Gilda, a skewer with anchovies, olives and hot peppers, was named after Rita Hayworth because she is similarly tall and spicy.

Pintxos eating is rooted in many traditions. First, you're meant to throw your napkins on the ground. This also means that the dirtier the pintxos bar, the better it is. In the case of La Mejillonera, where the specialty is mussels of all kinds, the empty shells are even discarded on the floor (think peanut shells in a New England ale house). The second most important thing about Basque culture is that everyone respects the honor system. You order drinks and bites as you go. When you're ready to leave, you tell the bartender what you had and pay. It was very jarring for this New Yorker not to pull out a credit card after each glass of Rioja. But it's a superior experience for the diner, so long as no one takes advantage.

I could go on and on about San Sebastian, but I want to let you discover it for yourself. Below is a list of all my favorite pintxos spots and what to eat there. Most places I discovered through San Sebastian Food, and a few I went to throughout the week per their recommendations. Each spot has a different specialty, which was usually written on a chalkboard behind the bar. The cold dishes are laid out on the counter, but you really need to know what each place is known for if you want to order right and not feel like a big dumb American weenie right off the plane.

1. Goiz Argi
Calle de Fermín Calbetón 4

This is the place to go for seafood a la plancha. We had wonderful prawn skewers (brocheta de gambas), grilled squid (chipiron a la plancha), and pimientos di padron. They all pair great with Txakoli, the young white wine of the region that was described to me as a "breakfast wine." Get the recipe for Squid and Shrimp Skewers here.

2. Txepetxa
Calle Pescaderia 5

If the fish-shaped menu on the wall is any indication, this place is all anchovies, all the time. Try the Gilda, the first pintxos invented in San Sebastian and named for Rita Hayworth because again, she is tall and spicy. This is also where I had the anchovy toast with blueberry jam. Have some sidra with the meal.

3. Zeruko
Calle Pescaderia 10 (right across from Txepetxa)

This is one of the modernist pintxos bars that incorporates some of the molecular gastronomy that the region is known for. The bar is full of interesting and beautiful creations. Go to town!

4. Borda Berri
Fermin Calbeton 12

We ate a ton here, and it's one of the places that I returned to. Idiazabal and Hongos (sheep milk cheese and wild mushroom) Risotto was amazing. But glutards be warned: "risotto" in San Sebastian is made with orzo, not rice. The Veal Cheeks (pictured) here are melt in your mouth amazing, as is the pulpo (octopus). Though less traditional in the north, they also served up a great Salmorejo -- a creamy-style gazpacho that was my go-to when traveling in Andalucia.

5. Gandarias
Calle 31 de Agosto

Don't miss the solomio (pictured). And do a little surf and turf by pairing it with the shrimp and chorizo brocheta. We drank an amazing red wine here: Ribera del Duero (Krel).

6. Gambara
Calle San Jeronimo 21

This is the place for seasonal specialties like the mushroom plate. It's expensive, but worth it. You'll never taste anything so pure and umami-laden. Wash it all down with a glass of Navarra rose.

7. La Viña
Calle Agosto, 31

I would have never guessed I'd be eating cheesecake in San Sebastian. But you'd be a fool to not grab a slice at La Vina. It's very light and airy -- a cross between a custard and a cheesecake. The tortilla ain't half bad either if you want to return for lunch. Get the recipe for Spanish-Style Cheesecake here.

8. La Mejillonera
Calle del Puerto 15

This place is packed with locals. Don't be shy and elbow your way to the counter. I had every type of mussels and they were all delicious. Try the mejillones picantes, Patatas Bravas, and Calamares.

9. La Cuchara de San Telmo
Calle 31 de Agosto, 28

This place was on the New York Times list and also makes a mean veal cheek. The bacalao and bonito were also delicious. Like Borda Berri you can't really go wrong with whatever is on the chalkboard. So get adventurous.

For more on where to eat, drink, and sleep in San Sebastian, check out my full guide here.


The 9 Best Pintxos Bars in San Sebastian and What to Eat There

San Sebastian has evolved into quite a food Mecca over the last 30 years. Together with the surrounding area, Spanish Basque country has the highest number of Michelin star restaurants in the world. But molecular gastronomy aside, it's really the down home pintxos bars -- the Basque equivalent of tapas -- that form the cornerstone of San Sebastian's foodie culture.

The old quarter of the city is packed with pintxos restaurants -- so many that knowing where to go and what to order can be very overwhelming. I was lucky to have some expert assistance when I began my trip. San Sebastian Food, a luxury gastronomy company in the area, showed me the ropes, took the reins on ordering, and indulged me in all my food nerdiness. It was great to have someone there give me all the cultural background on what I was eating, how the ingredients were produced, and why the dishes came to be -- like, for instance, that the Gilda, a skewer with anchovies, olives and hot peppers, was named after Rita Hayworth because she is similarly tall and spicy.

Pintxos eating is rooted in many traditions. First, you're meant to throw your napkins on the ground. This also means that the dirtier the pintxos bar, the better it is. In the case of La Mejillonera, where the specialty is mussels of all kinds, the empty shells are even discarded on the floor (think peanut shells in a New England ale house). The second most important thing about Basque culture is that everyone respects the honor system. You order drinks and bites as you go. When you're ready to leave, you tell the bartender what you had and pay. It was very jarring for this New Yorker not to pull out a credit card after each glass of Rioja. But it's a superior experience for the diner, so long as no one takes advantage.

I could go on and on about San Sebastian, but I want to let you discover it for yourself. Below is a list of all my favorite pintxos spots and what to eat there. Most places I discovered through San Sebastian Food, and a few I went to throughout the week per their recommendations. Each spot has a different specialty, which was usually written on a chalkboard behind the bar. The cold dishes are laid out on the counter, but you really need to know what each place is known for if you want to order right and not feel like a big dumb American weenie right off the plane.

1. Goiz Argi
Calle de Fermín Calbetón 4

This is the place to go for seafood a la plancha. We had wonderful prawn skewers (brocheta de gambas), grilled squid (chipiron a la plancha), and pimientos di padron. They all pair great with Txakoli, the young white wine of the region that was described to me as a "breakfast wine." Get the recipe for Squid and Shrimp Skewers here.

2. Txepetxa
Calle Pescaderia 5

If the fish-shaped menu on the wall is any indication, this place is all anchovies, all the time. Try the Gilda, the first pintxos invented in San Sebastian and named for Rita Hayworth because again, she is tall and spicy. This is also where I had the anchovy toast with blueberry jam. Have some sidra with the meal.

3. Zeruko
Calle Pescaderia 10 (right across from Txepetxa)

This is one of the modernist pintxos bars that incorporates some of the molecular gastronomy that the region is known for. The bar is full of interesting and beautiful creations. Go to town!

4. Borda Berri
Fermin Calbeton 12

We ate a ton here, and it's one of the places that I returned to. Idiazabal and Hongos (sheep milk cheese and wild mushroom) Risotto was amazing. But glutards be warned: "risotto" in San Sebastian is made with orzo, not rice. The Veal Cheeks (pictured) here are melt in your mouth amazing, as is the pulpo (octopus). Though less traditional in the north, they also served up a great Salmorejo -- a creamy-style gazpacho that was my go-to when traveling in Andalucia.

5. Gandarias
Calle 31 de Agosto

Don't miss the solomio (pictured). And do a little surf and turf by pairing it with the shrimp and chorizo brocheta. We drank an amazing red wine here: Ribera del Duero (Krel).

6. Gambara
Calle San Jeronimo 21

This is the place for seasonal specialties like the mushroom plate. It's expensive, but worth it. You'll never taste anything so pure and umami-laden. Wash it all down with a glass of Navarra rose.

7. La Viña
Calle Agosto, 31

I would have never guessed I'd be eating cheesecake in San Sebastian. But you'd be a fool to not grab a slice at La Vina. It's very light and airy -- a cross between a custard and a cheesecake. The tortilla ain't half bad either if you want to return for lunch. Get the recipe for Spanish-Style Cheesecake here.

8. La Mejillonera
Calle del Puerto 15

This place is packed with locals. Don't be shy and elbow your way to the counter. I had every type of mussels and they were all delicious. Try the mejillones picantes, Patatas Bravas, and Calamares.

9. La Cuchara de San Telmo
Calle 31 de Agosto, 28

This place was on the New York Times list and also makes a mean veal cheek. The bacalao and bonito were also delicious. Like Borda Berri you can't really go wrong with whatever is on the chalkboard. So get adventurous.

For more on where to eat, drink, and sleep in San Sebastian, check out my full guide here.


Watch the video: Festival de la Force Basque 1ère partie 22 août 2021 Saint palais. donapaleu (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Vulkis

    I congratulate, your thought is simply excellent

  2. Astyrian

    I absolutely agree with you. There is something about that, and I think it's a good idea.

  3. Radmund

    I believe you were wrong. I'm sure. We need to discuss. Write to me in PM.

  4. Zukree

    Theme Rulit



Write a message