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Spam Tacos

Spam Tacos


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If you’re in need of a simple weeknight recipe, look no further

If you’re in need of a simple weeknight recipe, look no further. This is a taco recipe that will get you in and out of the kitchen in 10 minutes.

Ingredients

  • 1 12-ounce can Spam
  • 1/2 Cup corn
  • 10 flour tortillas
  • Lettuce, shredded, for topping
  • Tomatoes, diced, for topping
  • Mexican cheese blend, for topping
  • Salsa, for serving

14 Ways to Use a Can of Spam

Whether it’s a mainstay in your pantry or you’re trying it for the first time, here are some fresh ways to use budget-friendly Spam.

Related To:

537799082

Photo by: Roberto Machado Noa/Getty

Since its release in 1937, Spam has gone from household innovation to celebrated World War II staple to American icon. As the first canned meat product that didn’t require refrigeration, it was met with skepticism, but eventually embraced by its initial target demographic – housewives looking for quick meal solutions that required little preparation. Despite a decades-long stronghold on grocery store shelves, there are plenty of consumers who have simply never tried the curiously preserved pork-and-ham product. However, there are those of us who grew up with it, whose pantries were never without it. Once you try (and enjoy) it, it’s hard not to have a couple cans stocked somewhere in your kitchen.

Spam Classic (12 oz, 8 pk.)

Although skepticism around the product still remains, Spam has remained popular in places where U.S. troops were stationed – like Hawaii. And in recent years, especially with the growing popularity of Hawaiian food in the continental U.S., it’s become not only a convenient – and versatile – meat option, but also an ingredient in its own right. It’s not just musubi – it’s Spam musubi. It’s not just fried rice – it’s Spam fried rice.

Whether you love the canned meat or are just trying it for the first time, here’s a list of ways you can cook with this tried-and-true, budget-friendly pantry staple.


14 Ways to Use a Can of Spam

Whether it’s a mainstay in your pantry or you’re trying it for the first time, here are some fresh ways to use budget-friendly Spam.

Related To:

537799082

Photo by: Roberto Machado Noa/Getty

Since its release in 1937, Spam has gone from household innovation to celebrated World War II staple to American icon. As the first canned meat product that didn’t require refrigeration, it was met with skepticism, but eventually embraced by its initial target demographic – housewives looking for quick meal solutions that required little preparation. Despite a decades-long stronghold on grocery store shelves, there are plenty of consumers who have simply never tried the curiously preserved pork-and-ham product. However, there are those of us who grew up with it, whose pantries were never without it. Once you try (and enjoy) it, it’s hard not to have a couple cans stocked somewhere in your kitchen.

Spam Classic (12 oz, 8 pk.)

Although skepticism around the product still remains, Spam has remained popular in places where U.S. troops were stationed – like Hawaii. And in recent years, especially with the growing popularity of Hawaiian food in the continental U.S., it’s become not only a convenient – and versatile – meat option, but also an ingredient in its own right. It’s not just musubi – it’s Spam musubi. It’s not just fried rice – it’s Spam fried rice.

Whether you love the canned meat or are just trying it for the first time, here’s a list of ways you can cook with this tried-and-true, budget-friendly pantry staple.


14 Ways to Use a Can of Spam

Whether it’s a mainstay in your pantry or you’re trying it for the first time, here are some fresh ways to use budget-friendly Spam.

Related To:

537799082

Photo by: Roberto Machado Noa/Getty

Since its release in 1937, Spam has gone from household innovation to celebrated World War II staple to American icon. As the first canned meat product that didn’t require refrigeration, it was met with skepticism, but eventually embraced by its initial target demographic – housewives looking for quick meal solutions that required little preparation. Despite a decades-long stronghold on grocery store shelves, there are plenty of consumers who have simply never tried the curiously preserved pork-and-ham product. However, there are those of us who grew up with it, whose pantries were never without it. Once you try (and enjoy) it, it’s hard not to have a couple cans stocked somewhere in your kitchen.

Spam Classic (12 oz, 8 pk.)

Although skepticism around the product still remains, Spam has remained popular in places where U.S. troops were stationed – like Hawaii. And in recent years, especially with the growing popularity of Hawaiian food in the continental U.S., it’s become not only a convenient – and versatile – meat option, but also an ingredient in its own right. It’s not just musubi – it’s Spam musubi. It’s not just fried rice – it’s Spam fried rice.

Whether you love the canned meat or are just trying it for the first time, here’s a list of ways you can cook with this tried-and-true, budget-friendly pantry staple.


14 Ways to Use a Can of Spam

Whether it’s a mainstay in your pantry or you’re trying it for the first time, here are some fresh ways to use budget-friendly Spam.

Related To:

537799082

Photo by: Roberto Machado Noa/Getty

Since its release in 1937, Spam has gone from household innovation to celebrated World War II staple to American icon. As the first canned meat product that didn’t require refrigeration, it was met with skepticism, but eventually embraced by its initial target demographic – housewives looking for quick meal solutions that required little preparation. Despite a decades-long stronghold on grocery store shelves, there are plenty of consumers who have simply never tried the curiously preserved pork-and-ham product. However, there are those of us who grew up with it, whose pantries were never without it. Once you try (and enjoy) it, it’s hard not to have a couple cans stocked somewhere in your kitchen.

Spam Classic (12 oz, 8 pk.)

Although skepticism around the product still remains, Spam has remained popular in places where U.S. troops were stationed – like Hawaii. And in recent years, especially with the growing popularity of Hawaiian food in the continental U.S., it’s become not only a convenient – and versatile – meat option, but also an ingredient in its own right. It’s not just musubi – it’s Spam musubi. It’s not just fried rice – it’s Spam fried rice.

Whether you love the canned meat or are just trying it for the first time, here’s a list of ways you can cook with this tried-and-true, budget-friendly pantry staple.


14 Ways to Use a Can of Spam

Whether it’s a mainstay in your pantry or you’re trying it for the first time, here are some fresh ways to use budget-friendly Spam.

Related To:

537799082

Photo by: Roberto Machado Noa/Getty

Since its release in 1937, Spam has gone from household innovation to celebrated World War II staple to American icon. As the first canned meat product that didn’t require refrigeration, it was met with skepticism, but eventually embraced by its initial target demographic – housewives looking for quick meal solutions that required little preparation. Despite a decades-long stronghold on grocery store shelves, there are plenty of consumers who have simply never tried the curiously preserved pork-and-ham product. However, there are those of us who grew up with it, whose pantries were never without it. Once you try (and enjoy) it, it’s hard not to have a couple cans stocked somewhere in your kitchen.

Spam Classic (12 oz, 8 pk.)

Although skepticism around the product still remains, Spam has remained popular in places where U.S. troops were stationed – like Hawaii. And in recent years, especially with the growing popularity of Hawaiian food in the continental U.S., it’s become not only a convenient – and versatile – meat option, but also an ingredient in its own right. It’s not just musubi – it’s Spam musubi. It’s not just fried rice – it’s Spam fried rice.

Whether you love the canned meat or are just trying it for the first time, here’s a list of ways you can cook with this tried-and-true, budget-friendly pantry staple.


14 Ways to Use a Can of Spam

Whether it’s a mainstay in your pantry or you’re trying it for the first time, here are some fresh ways to use budget-friendly Spam.

Related To:

537799082

Photo by: Roberto Machado Noa/Getty

Since its release in 1937, Spam has gone from household innovation to celebrated World War II staple to American icon. As the first canned meat product that didn’t require refrigeration, it was met with skepticism, but eventually embraced by its initial target demographic – housewives looking for quick meal solutions that required little preparation. Despite a decades-long stronghold on grocery store shelves, there are plenty of consumers who have simply never tried the curiously preserved pork-and-ham product. However, there are those of us who grew up with it, whose pantries were never without it. Once you try (and enjoy) it, it’s hard not to have a couple cans stocked somewhere in your kitchen.

Spam Classic (12 oz, 8 pk.)

Although skepticism around the product still remains, Spam has remained popular in places where U.S. troops were stationed – like Hawaii. And in recent years, especially with the growing popularity of Hawaiian food in the continental U.S., it’s become not only a convenient – and versatile – meat option, but also an ingredient in its own right. It’s not just musubi – it’s Spam musubi. It’s not just fried rice – it’s Spam fried rice.

Whether you love the canned meat or are just trying it for the first time, here’s a list of ways you can cook with this tried-and-true, budget-friendly pantry staple.


14 Ways to Use a Can of Spam

Whether it’s a mainstay in your pantry or you’re trying it for the first time, here are some fresh ways to use budget-friendly Spam.

Related To:

537799082

Photo by: Roberto Machado Noa/Getty

Since its release in 1937, Spam has gone from household innovation to celebrated World War II staple to American icon. As the first canned meat product that didn’t require refrigeration, it was met with skepticism, but eventually embraced by its initial target demographic – housewives looking for quick meal solutions that required little preparation. Despite a decades-long stronghold on grocery store shelves, there are plenty of consumers who have simply never tried the curiously preserved pork-and-ham product. However, there are those of us who grew up with it, whose pantries were never without it. Once you try (and enjoy) it, it’s hard not to have a couple cans stocked somewhere in your kitchen.

Spam Classic (12 oz, 8 pk.)

Although skepticism around the product still remains, Spam has remained popular in places where U.S. troops were stationed – like Hawaii. And in recent years, especially with the growing popularity of Hawaiian food in the continental U.S., it’s become not only a convenient – and versatile – meat option, but also an ingredient in its own right. It’s not just musubi – it’s Spam musubi. It’s not just fried rice – it’s Spam fried rice.

Whether you love the canned meat or are just trying it for the first time, here’s a list of ways you can cook with this tried-and-true, budget-friendly pantry staple.


14 Ways to Use a Can of Spam

Whether it’s a mainstay in your pantry or you’re trying it for the first time, here are some fresh ways to use budget-friendly Spam.

Related To:

537799082

Photo by: Roberto Machado Noa/Getty

Since its release in 1937, Spam has gone from household innovation to celebrated World War II staple to American icon. As the first canned meat product that didn’t require refrigeration, it was met with skepticism, but eventually embraced by its initial target demographic – housewives looking for quick meal solutions that required little preparation. Despite a decades-long stronghold on grocery store shelves, there are plenty of consumers who have simply never tried the curiously preserved pork-and-ham product. However, there are those of us who grew up with it, whose pantries were never without it. Once you try (and enjoy) it, it’s hard not to have a couple cans stocked somewhere in your kitchen.

Spam Classic (12 oz, 8 pk.)

Although skepticism around the product still remains, Spam has remained popular in places where U.S. troops were stationed – like Hawaii. And in recent years, especially with the growing popularity of Hawaiian food in the continental U.S., it’s become not only a convenient – and versatile – meat option, but also an ingredient in its own right. It’s not just musubi – it’s Spam musubi. It’s not just fried rice – it’s Spam fried rice.

Whether you love the canned meat or are just trying it for the first time, here’s a list of ways you can cook with this tried-and-true, budget-friendly pantry staple.


14 Ways to Use a Can of Spam

Whether it’s a mainstay in your pantry or you’re trying it for the first time, here are some fresh ways to use budget-friendly Spam.

Related To:

537799082

Photo by: Roberto Machado Noa/Getty

Since its release in 1937, Spam has gone from household innovation to celebrated World War II staple to American icon. As the first canned meat product that didn’t require refrigeration, it was met with skepticism, but eventually embraced by its initial target demographic – housewives looking for quick meal solutions that required little preparation. Despite a decades-long stronghold on grocery store shelves, there are plenty of consumers who have simply never tried the curiously preserved pork-and-ham product. However, there are those of us who grew up with it, whose pantries were never without it. Once you try (and enjoy) it, it’s hard not to have a couple cans stocked somewhere in your kitchen.

Spam Classic (12 oz, 8 pk.)

Although skepticism around the product still remains, Spam has remained popular in places where U.S. troops were stationed – like Hawaii. And in recent years, especially with the growing popularity of Hawaiian food in the continental U.S., it’s become not only a convenient – and versatile – meat option, but also an ingredient in its own right. It’s not just musubi – it’s Spam musubi. It’s not just fried rice – it’s Spam fried rice.

Whether you love the canned meat or are just trying it for the first time, here’s a list of ways you can cook with this tried-and-true, budget-friendly pantry staple.


14 Ways to Use a Can of Spam

Whether it’s a mainstay in your pantry or you’re trying it for the first time, here are some fresh ways to use budget-friendly Spam.

Related To:

537799082

Photo by: Roberto Machado Noa/Getty

Since its release in 1937, Spam has gone from household innovation to celebrated World War II staple to American icon. As the first canned meat product that didn’t require refrigeration, it was met with skepticism, but eventually embraced by its initial target demographic – housewives looking for quick meal solutions that required little preparation. Despite a decades-long stronghold on grocery store shelves, there are plenty of consumers who have simply never tried the curiously preserved pork-and-ham product. However, there are those of us who grew up with it, whose pantries were never without it. Once you try (and enjoy) it, it’s hard not to have a couple cans stocked somewhere in your kitchen.

Spam Classic (12 oz, 8 pk.)

Although skepticism around the product still remains, Spam has remained popular in places where U.S. troops were stationed – like Hawaii. And in recent years, especially with the growing popularity of Hawaiian food in the continental U.S., it’s become not only a convenient – and versatile – meat option, but also an ingredient in its own right. It’s not just musubi – it’s Spam musubi. It’s not just fried rice – it’s Spam fried rice.

Whether you love the canned meat or are just trying it for the first time, here’s a list of ways you can cook with this tried-and-true, budget-friendly pantry staple.


Watch the video: Hawaiian Tacos?!? What Are Those?!? Lets Give It a Try. Blackstone Griddles (June 2022).


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